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A Feast Fit for God

The recipient of an invitation to a feast in the 18th century could look forward to several large courses at the banquet table. First would come steaming mushroom broth, then beetroot salad, and baked pudding. Next would come rich meats that included boiled rabbit, as well as chicken and stewed beef. Finally,  sweet temptations which included “Bishop’s Fingers,” fine cheeses, and apple cream. And gluttony throughout the two-hour meal was considered good manners for men and women alike. But the party was considered a complete success if none of the cooks were ill with “pox” while serving food they’d breathed on!

Banquets and feasts are part of celebrating in cultures the world over. Many of the wonderful times we spend in the company of family and friends center around favorite foods with familiar aromas that bring a flood of past joys each time we experience them.

Our heavenly Father loves a feast as well, and He promises us that we will partake in a wonderful feast in heaven. Until then, there is another kind of feast at a different banquet that we can partake in, with  God the honored guest:

Spread for me a banquet of praise, serve High God a feast of kept promises, And call for help when you’re in trouble—I’ll help you, and you’ll honor me.  Psalm 50:15

Only in our imagination can we experience what our banquet in heaven might be like. But while we are earthbound, we can offer a feast of kept promises from a pure heart towards God, and a banquet filled with the praise He deserves. As we honor Him in this way, He stretches His Hands toward us to help in our time of need. Will you make Him the honored Guest of your life today?

About Lisa

Lisa
My husband Dan and I have three children and three grandchildren. We live in central Illinois. I am a graduate of The Institute of Children's Literature, a member of faithwriters.com, and a member of SCBWI. My writings have been published at chirstiandevotions.us, in DevotionMagazine, the PrairieWind Newsletter, and here at thebottomline.co.

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